Reasons For Organic Gardening

If you love to garden, you may already be aware of some of the value of fresh vegetables. However, there are many advantages that you might not have considered. That’s especially true if you garden using natural, organic methods and not pesticides.

One reason that organic gardening might be right for you is that such vegetables are much healthier to eat. Vegetables bought at the store are often grown with chemicals that our bodies simply do not need. Although such foods are regulated and deemed safe by the government, why not have complete control over what you eat by growing your own?

Another good reason to grow organic foods is to save money. Yes, you’ll have to buy the seeds or plants, but you’ll have fresh vegetables each season right outside your door, or even in your house if you choose to grow them indoors. So, they’ll pay for themselves the first time you eat some and keep saving you money and time every time you eat them after that.

Another great reason to grow organic foods is that it protects the environment. If you have kids or pets or just plain like watching wildlife out the window, the last thing you want to do is poison them or the land that they play on with pesticides.

You might be wondering how you’re going to keep your plants growing without pesticides. Well, you can grow organic foods and protect them with other foods, instead. That’s because some plants … Read More

Composting With Worms at Home

Composting with wormscan be done anywhere, even at home. These soil creatures can certainly help convert your kitchen scraps and garden wastes into a hefty supply of organic resource. Imagine how much you can save the earth just by reducing your household garbage with the assistance of only Red wiggler worms or European nightcrawlers.

Organic scraps that can be converted into worm compost

Whether you choose to do some worm composting indoors or outdoors, the variety of organic materials that you can feed composting worms are plenty. You can feed these worms anything but the following: meat, poultry, seafood, and dairy. Also avoid feeding compost worms substances that will give them health complications such as citrusy products, and other salty, spicy, and oily matter. What they can eat though are fruits and vegetable peels, crushed eggshells, used coffee grounds and coffee filters, tea bags, presoaked newspaper or cardboard shreds, grass clippings, coconut coir, and dead plants.

Setting-up your worm bin with the essentials

For starters, you can use an opaque-colored plastic container, like a Rubbermaid bin for example. Make sure that you choose to use a container that can hold or store more or less 1000 red worms. You should start with this number, as you can always decide on having the worms transferred to a different composter as soon as the population grows.

Drilled holes around the worm bin are important

Your worm composter will need to be drilled with several evenly spaced holes around it, as … Read More